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‘Bomb Cyclone’ Hits Northeast With Heavy Snow and Hurricane-Force Winds – Over 3700 Flights Cancelled!

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‘Bomb Cyclone’ Hits Northeast With Heavy Snow and Hurricane-Force Winds – Over 3700 Flights Cancelled!

‘Bomb Cyclone’ Hits Northeast With Heavy Snow and Hurricane-Force Winds – Over 3700 Flights Cancelled!

Thursday on the East Coast, the big ‘bomb cyclone’ caused a white out which caused schools and offices to close and cancelled thousands of flights. From the Southeast Carolinas to Northeast Maine not only was the storm causing hurricane-force winds, but damaging floods as well. Forecasts for at least 18 inches of snow were expected.

In addition to this brutal bomb cyclone, forecasters expected the system to be followed immediately by a blast of cold air that could break records in more than two dozen cities. In fact, wind chills are expected to fall to minus 40 in some places.

In addition, hurricane-force winds were expected  to hit at least 75 mph. Blizzard warnings and states of emergency are in wide effect in the Northeast. Even states like Massachusetts and Rhode Island are bracing for more snow.

The ‘bomb cyclone’ brought fast, heavy snowfall and high winds, as the barometric pressure plunged quickly.

Officials reported several road accidents throughout the Northeast, including a 32-year-old woman  in Manchester, New Hampshire, who crashed her vehicle through the wall of a nursing home. Fortunately, no one was injured in that accident.

CURRENT SNOWFALL TOTALS 
City Inches 
NEW YORK, NY 9
BOSTON, MA 6.5 
PROVIDENCE, RI  10.4 
PORTLAND, ME  4.3 

In addition to the whiteout and snow, the risk of power outages raised concerns about people going without heat. More than 100 warming centers were opened in 34 towns across Connecticut.

Schools were also ordered closed in New York City, many parts of New Jersey, Boston and elsewhere throughout the Northeast region.

The Amtrak train service was cancelled between New York and Boston on Thursday as well.

The National Weather Service received multiple reports of coastal flooding in Massachusetts that made roads impassable.

Seawater was seen rising near buildings in downtown Boston and the suburb of Lynn. One video shows floodwaters carrying a car down the street in the Seaport neighborhood of Boston.

In the district, Joe Weatherly, a 40-year-old artist from Los Angeles, held his Boston terrier while searching for a seafood restaurant. Part of the district was flooded.

‘For someone in California, this is really, really scary. Mind blowing,’ he said. ‘We don’t live in a state where things shut down with the weather. I’ve just never seen this much snow in my life.’

Some 65,000 homes and businesses in the Northeast were without power, though that number was expected to rise as the storm intensified across the region.

On Thursday morning, more than 5,500 homes and businesses lost power in Provincetown, Massachusetts, on the outermost tip of Cape Cod, which was lashed with hurricane-force wind gusts, according to Eversource electric utility. Much of that power has already been restored.

With wind gusts toppling trees and power lines in the Northeast, more than two-thirds of flights in and out of New York City and Boston airports were cancelled. The flight-tracking site FlightAware reported more than 4,000 flights cancelled in and outof the U.S.

The conditions were so bad in New York City that all flights in and our of JFK and LaGuardia airports were suspended during the bomb cyclone or storm.

Record low temperatures were predicted for 28 major cities across New England, eastern New York and the mid-Atlantic states by early Sunday morning. Boston is expecting a low around  -11 overnight Saturday. Parts of Maine and Vermont could see -16 and -19 according to the National Weather Service.

Boston is expected to set a high tide record of at least 15 feet.

 

Heavy snow, hurricane-force winds and white-out conditions – a total bomb cyclone!

Bundle up folks and stay safe!

 

 

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